There are many things that make Thanksgiving a special time of year. It’s an opportunity to sit down and spend time with our family and friends. It’s a time to reflect on the many blessings we enjoy throughout the year, and of course, it’s a time for great food. 

This Thanksgiving, as you prepare your meals, take pride in knowing that many of the Thanksgiving foods we enjoy are produced right here in Wisconsin. 

Take dinner rolls, for example. 
Wisconsin is famous for being “America’s Dairyland,” but we also have been known as “America’s Breadbasket.” From 1840- 1880, one-sixth of the nation’s wheat came from Wisconsin fields, and although we are no longer the country’s top wheat producer, it is still among  Wisconsin’s leading industries.

How about those mashed potatoes… 
When you think of potatoes, Wisconsin may not come to mind, but our state is actually the third leading potato producer in the country, just behind Idaho and Washington. 

…with a side of corn?
More than 15,000 farmers in Wisconsin grow corn on approximately three million acres, and the state is one of the top producers in the nation. In addition to food, Wisconsin corn is used for livestock feed, and about 10 percent of the state’s production is exported. 

What would a Wisconsin meal be without cheese?
They don’t call us “cheeseheads” for nothing. Wisconsin ranks number one in the United States for cheese production. Whether it’s cheese and crackers before dinner, shredded cheese sprinkled in our salads or on our potatoes, or baked with love into our green bean casseroles, it’s hard to imagine Thanksgiving without delicious Wisconsin cheese.

Wash it down with an ice-cold glass of milk. 
Wisconsin has been the country’s leading dairy state since 1915, and it’s a proud tradition we hold today. Our state is a national leader in milk production with more than 10,000 dairy farms, each with an average of 120 dairy cows. 

And don’t forget the cranberry sauce.
Wisconsin has been the largest producer of cranberries in the country for the last 20 years. In fact, Wisconsin is the largest producer of cranberries in the world. They are Wisconsin’s largest fruit industry, and the cranberry was declared the official state fruit in 2004. More than 250 growers throughout the state produce cranberries on land that spans 20 counties. That’s a lot of cranberries! 

I’m thankful for many things, including my family, friends, health, and the privilege of serving the people of Wisconsin’s Fifth District. Thank you for the opportunity to be your representative. Have a safe and blessed Thanksgiving Day.