On the eve of Veterans Day, it is important to take time to thank the brave Americans who have risked their lives for our country. Last Thursday I was honored to join President Obama, Congressman Ron Kind (D-Wis.), distinguished guests and family members of Lt. Alonzo Cushing as he was posthumously awarded the Medal of Honor at the White House.

This award comes 151 years after Lt. Cushing, a native of Delafield, made the ultimate sacrifice to help secure a victory for the Union during the Battle of Gettysburg. Lt. Cushing courageously led 110 men in battle as they faced the numerically superior Confederate forces during Pickett’s Charge in 1863, securing his place in history as a Civil War hero.

Not only does the award honor Lt. Cushing, it also culminates the hard work of Wisconsin residents, including Margaret Zerwekh, a historian from Delafield who initiated the effort, and more than two decades of bipartisan work in Congress. The Medal of Honor is the highest military honor, awarded for acts of valor above and beyond the call of duty. It typically must be awarded within three years of the heroic act. Congressman Kind and I sponsored legislation to waive the three-year limit and allow Lt. Cushing the recognition he deserves.

Lt. Cushing’s Medal of Honor is a testament to the positive work we can do when we reach across the aisle and further proof that the sacrifices made by our veterans are never forgotten.

Full video of White House ceremony, here.


Photo: Doug Mills/The New York Times