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Washington, D.C. Congressman Jim Sensenbrenner (WI-05) offered the following statement regarding Wisconsin Governor Tony Evers’ request for a Major Disaster Declaration for southeastern Wisconsin, following the severe storms and flooding that occurred in January 2020. Congressman Sensenbrenner joined his colleagues from the Wisconsin delegation in sending the following letter to President Donald Trump:

“Today, I joined my congressional delegation colleagues in requesting that the White House approve Governor Evers’ request for a Major Disaster Declaration in Wisconsin. This declaration would bring much needed federal assistance to the southeastern part of our great state. I hope that this request will be reviewed and considered promptly, and that FEMA will continue to work with the state and local governments to facilitate the recovery and rebuilding necessary.”

Washington, D.C. Congressman Jim Sensenbrenner (WI-05) offered the following statement after making numerous points of order on the House Floor during today’s House debate on the so-called “Equal Rights Amendment.” 

“I was amazed by the ruling of the Chair during today’s House debate on the Equal Rights Amendment (ERA). I made two specific points of order that were both rejected out of hand and without a vote of the House. The majority’s outrageous disregard for the Constitution was on a full display. I am both disappointed and dismayed. The snap ruling of the Chair does not supersede the authority of the Constitution. Three-quarters of the states failed to ratify the ERA by the deadline set by Congress. House Democrats voted to retroactively revive a failed constitutional amendment. A two-thirds vote is vote is required to amend the Constitution and I believe a two-thirds vote of the House of Representatives is necessary for removal of the deadline.

Washington, D.C.– Today, Congressman Jim Sensenbrenner (WI-05) joined several of his colleagues to introduce HR 5769, the Statement of Harm to the American Majority (SHAM) Act in the House of Representatives. This legislation requires the Government Accountability Office (GAO) to conduct an audit of the use of funds, and loss of government productivity, due to the impeachment inquiry and trial of President Trump. The audit must include costs, time spent, and estimations on loss of productivity.

“Now that President Trump has been acquitted of this sham impeachment by the United States Senate, it is imperative that a full autopsy of wasted funds and loss of government productivity is ordered. I am pleased to sign on as a co-sponsor of the Statement of Harm to the American Majority (SHAM) Act.”

Washington, D.C. Today, the House passed HR 4031, the Great Lakes Restoration Initiative Act . Congressman Jim Sensenbrenner (WI-05) is a co-sponsor of the legislation, which delivers large benefits to Great Lakes communities and helps to conserve the lakes as a valuable resource. 

“The House extension of the Great Lakes Restoration Initiative (GLRI) Act is an important step in boosting Great Lakes communities. This legislation will benefit Wisconsin’s hard working families and lake industries. It is an important step in conserving the lakes as a precious resource. This vote has been long overdue, and I urge the Senate to approve this legislation as soon as possible.”

Washington, D.C.Congressman Jim Sensenbrenner (WI-05) offered the following statement after the United States Senate voted to acquit President Donald Trump on charges brought forth by a partisan-fueled impeachment resolution:

Democrats have wanted to impeach President Trump since January 20, 2017. They got to scratch that itch and eventually presented articles of impeachment to the United States Senate. Today, the Senate concluded that the allegations against the President did not meet the high bar of removal from office. Now, we can tear the articles of impeachment in half and pitch them into the dustbin of history.”

Washington, D.C.Congressman Jim Sensenbrenner (WI-05) offered the following statement after President Trump delivered his third State of the Union address:

“Just last week, the President signed the United States-Mexico-Canada Agreement (USMCA) into law. A significant piece of legislation, that I was proud to support in the House of Representatives. America’s economy continues to strengthen as Wisconsin businesses and manufacturers are seeing added signs of growth.

Tonight, in his speech, the President outlined a bold and optimistic vision for a safer and more prosperous America — expanding on economic successes, strengthening our military, confronting the ever-present issues in our healthcare system, and enacting a safe and legal immigration system. I look forward to working with the President on these important issues.”

Washington, D.C.— Congressman Jim Sensenbrenner (WI-05) offered the following statement after President Donald Trump signed the United States-Mexico-Canada Agreement (USMCA) into law:

“I was proud to support the USMCA in the United States House of Representatives. This historic bipartisan agreement will help modernize trade and expand America’s economy. It is a victory for Wisconsin farmers, manufacturers, businesses, and workers.”

Brookfield, WI—Today, Congressman Jim Sensenbrenner (WI-05) announced the nomination of 27 candidates from Wisconsin’s Fifth Congressional District for appointment to the U.S. service academies.

Rep. Sensenbrenner: “I am pleased to nominate these exceptional young men and women to our service academies. They have demonstrated themselves to be gifted students and respected members of our community. I congratulate them on this achievement and have full confidence that they will represent our state well. I would also like to thank our Academy Selection Committee for their efforts in helping identify the most qualified candidates.”

Nominees are designated as “principal” or “competing alternate.” Principal nominees who meet academic, physical, and medical standards set by each academy are guaranteed an appointment to that academy. Alternate nominees compete for available slots should any principal nominees choose not to accept or fail to qualify for their appointment. Additionally, alternate nominees are part of a pool of applicants from which the academies select the incoming class.

The United States Merchant Marine Academy does not differentiate between principal and competing alternate nominations.

This year, Congressman Sensenbrenner nominated 27 students, including three principal nominees. They are as follows:

Principal Nominees
Kate Hall of Pewaukee has been named a principal nominee to the US Air Force Academy in Colorado Springs, CO. Kate, daughter of Chief Warrant Officer Matthew and Mrs. Denise Hall, attends University Lake School.

James Miller of West Bend has been named a principal nominee to the US Military Academy in West Point, NY. James, son of Lance and Heidi Miller, attends West Bend West High School.

Mae Myers of Oconomowoc has been named a principal nominee to the US Naval Academy in Annapolis, MD, and an alternate nominee to the US Military Academy in West Point, NY. Mae, daughter of Eric and Sarah Myers, attends Arrowhead High School.

Competing Alternate Nominees and United States Merchant Marine Academy Nominees
Coleton Borkowicz of Hartland has been named an alternate nominee to the US Air Force Academy in Colorado Springs, CO and US Military Academy in West Point, NY. Coleton, son of Mark and Jennifer Borkowicz, attends Arrowhead High School.

Caleb Buettner of Brookfield has been named an alternate nominee to the US Military Academy in West Point, NY. Caleb, son of Kevin and Corie Buettner, attends Charles J. Colgan High School in Manassas, VA.

Skyler Chauff of Oconomowoc has been named an alternate nominee to the US Military Academy in West Point, NY. Skyler, son of Bertrand and Evelyn Chauff, attends St. John’s Northwestern Military Academy.

Grant Conlon of Oconomowoc has been named an alternate nominee to the US Air Force Academy in Colorado Springs, CO. Grant, son of James and Sharon Conlon, attends Marquette University High School.

Benjamin Didier of Wauwatosa has been named an alternate nominee to the US Military Academy in West Point, NY. Benjamin, son of John and Jill Didier, attends Marquette University.

Alexander Fordham of Waukesha has been named an alternate nominee to the US Naval Academy in Annapolis, MD and a nominee to the US Merchant Marine Academy in Kings Point, NY. Alexander, son of Stephen and Susan Fordham, attends Waukesha West High School.

Justine Hansen of Waukesha has been named a nominee to the US Merchant Marine Academy in Kings Point, NY. Justine, daughter of Shawn and Charity Hansen, attends Martin Luther High School.

Madelyn Hansen of Fort Atkinson has been named a nominee to the US Merchant Marine Academy in Kings Point, NY. Madelyn, daughter of Kyle and Christine Hansen, attends Fort Atkinson High School.

Andrew Hodgson of Brookfield has been named an alternate nominee to the US Military Academy in West Point, NY and US Naval Academy in Annapolis, MD. Andrew, son of James and Erica Hodgson, attends Brookfield Central High School.

Michael Hoggatt of Brookfield has been named an alternate nominee to the US Air Force Academy in Colorado Springs, CO. Michael, son of Scott and Judy Hoggatt, attends Brookfield Academy.

Julia Jensen of Brookfield has been named an alternate nominee to the US Air Force Academy in Colorado Springs, CO. Julia, daughter of Joel and Carrie Jensen, attends Brookfield Academy.

Jacob Kohlmeier of Wauwatosa has been named a nominee to the US Merchant Marine Academy in Kings Point, NY, and a competing alternate nominee to the US Naval Academy in Annapolis, MD. Jacob, son of James and Laura Kohlmeier, attends Oakland University.

Brandon Lee of Brookfield has been named a nominee to the US Merchant Marine Academy in Kings Point, NY. Brandon, son of Yonggon and Yuna Lee, attends Brookfield Central High School.

Ryan Mitchell of Watertown has been named an alternate nominee to the US Military Academy in West Point, NY. Ryan, son of Ralph III and Laurie (Russell) Mitchell, attends Watertown High School.

Jordan Nance of West Allis has been named an alternate nominee to the US Naval Academy in Annapolis, MD. Jordan, son of James and Stephanie Nance, attends Nathan Hale High School.

Patrick O’Connor of Watertown has been named an alternate nominee to the US Air Force Academy in Colorado Springs, CO, US Military Academy in West Point, NY and US Naval Academy in Annapolis, MD. Patrick, son of David and Patricia O’Connor, attends Watertown High School.

Mary Otten of Menomonee Falls has been named an alternate nominee to the US Naval Academy in Annapolis, MD. Mary, daughter of Mark and Janet Otten, attends Divine Savior Holy Angels High School.

Alexander Peterson of Pewaukee has been named an alternate nominee to the US Air Force Academy in Colorado Springs, CO and US Naval Academy in Annapolis, MD. Alexander, son of Philip and Denise Kilway Peterson, attends Trinity Academy.

Noah Ross of Hartland has been named an alternate nominee to the US Air Force Academy in Colorado Springs, CO and US Naval Academy in Annapolis, MD, and a nominee to the US Merchant Marine Academy in Kings Point, NY. Noah, son of Peter and Amber Ross, attends Arrowhead High School.

Collin Schulz of Fort Atkinson has been named an alternate nominee to the US Air Force Academy in Colorado Springs, CO and a nominee to the US Merchant Marine Academy in Kings Point, NY. Collin, son of Todd and LaRae Schulz, attends Lakeside Lutheran High School.

Maxwell Schwab of Waukesha has been named an alternate nominee to the US Air Force Academy in Colorado Springs, CO and US Naval Academy in Annapolis, MD. Maxwell, son of Jeffrey and Kelly Schwab, attends Waukesha North High School.

Nathaniel Sitzberger of Ixonia has been named a nominee to the US Merchant Marine Academy in Kings Point, NY. Nathaniel, son of Robert Sitzberger and Heidi Graf, attends Oconomowoc High School.

Luke Slosar of West Allis has been named a nominee to the US Merchant Marine Academy in Kings Point, NY. Luke, son of Richard and Sharon Slosar, attends Marion Military Institute in Marion, AL.

Spencer Thusius of Greenfield has been named an alternate nominee to the US Military Academy in West Point, NY. Spencer, son of Paul and Nichole Thusius, attends Greenfield High School. 

By: Emily Cochrane of The New York Times

WASHINGTON — On New Year’s Day in 1999, Representative Jim Sensenbrenner, Republican of Wisconsin, sat on the floor of his Capitol Hill office, surrounded by piles of documents and legal notes, drafting his opening argument in President Bill Clinton’s impeachment trial in the Senate.

With the sound of the University of Wisconsin Badgers facing off against the U.C.L.A. Bruins in the Rose Bowl blaring from a television in the background, Mr. Sensenbrenner readied his case that the president should be removed from office for lying about a sexual affair with a White House intern.

In the coming days, Speaker Nancy Pelosi, Democrat of California, is expected to select four to 10 members of the House of Representatives for a similar assignment, making the case to the Senate for why President Trump deserves to be ousted for pressuring Ukraine to investigate his political rivals. But unlike Mr. Sensenbrenner or the dozen other prosecutors who made the case against Mr. Clinton 21 years ago, the new prosecutors will not have had the benefit of a two-week holiday break to prepare their arguments or hone their strategies.

On Friday, after a weekslong impasse, Ms. Pelosi alerted lawmakers that she would move next week to transmit the articles of impeachment to the Senate, prompting the start of a Senate trial as early as Wednesday.

Ms. Pelosi’s decision to withhold the articles of impeachment in an unsuccessful effort to extract assurances from Senate leadership about the terms of the trial has delayed the appointment of the so-called impeachment managers, raising the stakes and compressing the timetable of their already challenging task.

It is a job that veterans say is fraught with legal complexity, political pressure and historic significance.

“I really don’t want to give them any advice,” Mr. Sensenbrenner said in an interview. “But I guess I can say is that this is going to be a lot more work than you think.”

“The American people,” he added, “are going to be watching.”

The pivotal role of the managers is one reason that Ms. Pelosi has waited to send the charges to the Senate. Senator Mitch McConnell, Republican of Kentucky and the majority leader, said this week that he had the votes to move forward with an impeachment trial without committing to calling witnesses or hearing new evidence. Without knowing whether there will be witnesses to question or new complex documents to digest, the speaker cannot decide what kind of lawmakers are best suited to the task.

People close to Ms. Pelosi say it is all but certain that one of the managers will be Representative Adam B. Schiff of California, a former federal prosecutor who oversees the Intelligence Committee and led the investigation into Mr. Trump’s dealings with Ukraine. Representative Jerrold Nadler of New York, the chairman of the Judiciary Committee that approved the two articles of impeachment against the president that the House passed last month, is also widely expected to be a leader of the group. But for now, final decisions on the rest of the team remain unresolved.

Times have changed considerably since 1998, when the Republican-led House sent 13 white men to the Senate to serve as impeachment managers. Given the diversity of today’s rank-and-file Democrats, Ms. Pelosi is likely to select a group to prosecute Mr. Trump that includes women and members of color.

Mr. Sensenbrenner had previously served as an impeachment manager in the case of Walter Louis Nixon Jr., a federal judge who was impeached and removed from the bench for lying to federal grand juries. In his preparation for the Clinton trial, Mr. Sensenbrenner recalled being given some wry advice from the House Judiciary Committee chairman at the time, Henry J. Hyde, Republican of Illinois, who instructed him to keep his opening statement shorter than the two-and-a-half-day speech that kicked off President Andrew Johnson’s impeachment trial in 1868.

Another impeachment manager, James E. Rogan, a Republican from California, was chosen despite having just joined the House in 1997, in part because he had previously been a prosecutor, which had helped land him a seat on the Judiciary Committee.

Mr. Rogan was defeated by Mr. Schiff in 2000 and is now a state trial court judge in California. A framed poster that hangs above the door to his judicial chambers in Orange County reminds him daily of the vitriol he attracted as one of Mr. Clinton’s main antagonists. “People unite! DENOUNCE ROGAN!!!” it reads.

“I’ve been through one of these before,” Representative Steve Chabot, Republican of Ohio, one of the 13 Clinton impeachment managers, said at a hearing last month. “And they’re ugly. So I have a lot of sympathy for the House managers that are going to be picked.”

In the years since Mr. Clinton’s trial, the job of the managers has only grown more complex. The debate is also more starkly partisan than it was then, with almost no defections from either side. Social media now allows for running commentary online, including by the president himself. During the House’s impeachment inquiry, Mr. Trump used Twitter to disparage witnesses as they were testifying against him.

“I guess what the president was doing is doing his own cross-examination on Twitter,” Mr. Sensenbrenner observed.

Nearly all of the 13 managers from Mr. Clinton’s trial are still alive and three remain in Congress: Mr. Sensenbrenner and Mr. Chabot both still sit on the Judiciary Committee and voted last month against impeaching Mr. Trump. The third is Lindsey Graham, Republican of South Carolina, who is now a senator and the chairman of that chamber’s Judiciary Committee. He will serve as one of 100 jurors in the Senate trial.

“To see Jim Sensenbrenner and Steve Chabot up there, and Lindsey Graham up on the other side, it is sort of odd,” said former Representative Bob Barr, Republican of Georgia, another of the Clinton impeachment managers. “Here we are 20 years later, and we’re doing the exact same thing again.”

Some have revisited their experience, publicly and privately, as the country readies for another impeachment trial. Mr. Sensenbrenner consulted with Republican leaders in the House before the vote on impeachment articles, and Mr. Graham has described his experience to Republican lawmakers on both sides of the Capitol about his experience. Mr. Rogan said that one Democrat on the Judiciary Committee, whom he declined to name, had reached out to him for advice. Others have been less candid about their thoughts on the current impeachment proceedings. Charles T. Canady, who is now chief justice of the Florida Supreme Court, has declined all interview requests on the subject.

“They need to understand the seriousness of what they’re going into,” said Bill McCollum, a former representative from Florida who was one of the Clinton impeachment managers. “They’re going to be doing something very unique — very few people have done what they’re about to do.”

The job comes with political risks. Mr. Rogan lost his seat to Mr. Schiff in part because Democrats targeted him for his role in the impeachment proceedings. Democrats argue that current Republicans in Congress will suffer electoral retribution for their united defense of Mr. Trump.

Mr. Sensenbrenner, who is not running for re-election after more than 40 years in the House, acknowledged that retirement absolved him of any concerns about being punished by voters as a consequence of his full-throated defense of Mr. Trump.

“I really can avoid people coming up to me back home, saying, ‘I’m never going to vote for you again, because you did this,’” he said.

Mr. Sensenbrenner’s perspective on the charges against Mr. Trump — he calls them “phony” — are the opposite of how he viewed those made against Mr. Clinton 21 years ago.

But the experience still feels familiar, he said.

“I’m going through the déjà vu period of my life,” he said as he left the House floor before the impeachment votes. “I never thought I would have to do this again.”

By: Stephen Kelley of WQOW

(WQOW) - Four members of Wisconsin's Republican Congressional delegation have signed a brief asking for the United States Supreme Court to overturn Roe v. Wade.

They were among 39 Republican senators and 168 representatives to send the brief over to the high court.

It was submitted in the case of June Medical Services LLC vs. Gee which the court will take up this spring.

The Louisiana lawsuit would require doctors performing abortions to have admitting privileges at a hospital within 30 miles of where the abortion is being performed.

State officials say the law would effectively close all of the state's abortion clinics.

For decades, Roe v. Wade has been a roadblock for Republicans seeking to curtail access to abortion, but lawmakers are hopeful for change based on the current conservative majority in the Supreme Court.

Wisconsin lawmakers who signed on include Senator Ron Johnson, Representative Glenn Grothman (R-Glenbeulah), Representative Jim Sensenbrenner (R-Menomonee Falls), Representative Bryan Stiel, (R-Janesville).

Mike Gallagher a Republican representative out of Green Bay and all Wisconsin Democrats did not sign on to the brief.